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Horticulture in the Heartland

Clinton Community College and the Bickelhaupt Arboretum are offering their annual Horticulture in the Heartland seminar. Mark Hirsch, Author and Photographer, will be the keynote speaker. The event is sponsored by Clinton Trees Forever, Bickelhaupt Arboretum, Clinton Community College, and Clinton County Master Gardeners.

This year’s seminar will be held at Clinton Community College on Saturday, March 4, 2017. Registration is open now through February 18 including a $30 registration. Late registration is available February 19 - 25 with a $35 registration fee. Coffee, rolls and lunch are included. Download the Horticulture in the Heartland Brochure to register.

8 a.m.

Registration

8:20 a.m.

Welcome

8:30 a.m.

Keynote: Shades of Wisdom
Mark Hirsch, Author/Photographer

Mark is the author of the book, “That Tree.” He began
his career as a newspaper photojournalist at the Telegraph
Herald in Dubuque, Iowa. Following a bad automobile
accident, he discovered an old oak tree in a Wisconsin
cornfield leading to a creative and philosophical change
in his perspectives on life, photography, art, nature and the
environment. Today, Mark shares those lessons learned from
his friendship with “That Tree.”

9:30 a.m. - 12:10 p.m.

Breakout Sessions

Horticulture in the Heartland is used to educate and inspire others to seek enjoyment and fulfillment through a variety of home gardening related topics and activities.

There are a choice of 12 breakout session throughout the day and also DOOR PRIZES!

Sessions

Session 1 (9:30 - 10:20 a.m.)

  1. A Simple Approach to Landscape Photography
    Mark Hirsch, Author/Photographer
    Spend a session with Mark Hirsch to learn how he transforms his visual discoveries of the natural world into personally rewarding photographs using only the camera in his smartphone. The best camera is the one you have with you! Photographic lessons learned from a friendship with “That Tree.”

  2. Green Side Up
    Emily Swihart, Field Coordinator, Trees Forever
    Join us as we prepare for the upcoming planting season with a refresher course on proper planting techniques, maintenance practices and over all tree care. Upon completion of the session, you will be Professional Hole Digger (PHD), ready to confidently select your specimen, prepare the site, plant your tree and care for your newest family member.

  3. Trumpeter Swans
    Mark Roberts, Conservation Education Coordinator, Clinton County Conservation
    Learn about the very successful reintroduction of trumpeter swans to Clinton County. Clinton County Conservation has been a leader in the effort to bring back the trumpeter swan as a wild, nesting bird for the past 20 years. Learn more about the ups and downs of the effort and where we are today.

 

Session 2 (10:30 - 11:20 a.m.)

  1. Tips on Topiary
    Deb Monroe, Clinton County Master Gardeners, and Margo Hansen, Director of Programs, Bickelhaupt Arboretum
    This dynamic duo will walk you through the art of topiary from start to finish. They will demonstrate with real live houseplants plant selection, planting, pruning and everything in between. Hecklers please sit to the back of the room!

  2. The Ultimate Winter Bird Survey: Summary of the First Ever Christmas Bird Count Marathon
    Kelly J. McKay, Director, BioEco Research and Monitoring Center
    This session covers the history and characteristics of the Christmas Bird Count (CBC) program, as well as the genesis of the CBC Marathon. A daily summary of the first ever successfully completed CBC Marathon will be provided, including some of the interesting aspects involved.

  3. Cultivating Plants & Growing North America’s First City - Cahokia
    Dr. Michael Wiant, Interim Director, Illinois State Museum
    The cultivation of a suite of domesticated plants, especially Zea maize, gave rise to North America’s first city, Cahokia. At its zenith, Cahokia was home to as many as 20,000 people in a community that covered near six square miles. An earthwork rising 100 feet and covering 14 acres stands at the center of Cahokia. It was constructed by people moving earth a basket-load at a time. The rise of Cahokia is testimony to the power of plants, among other thing. The fall of Cahokia may be attributed in part to the impact of an urban area on its surrounding landscape.

Session 3 (11:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.)

  1. Frogs, Toads and Turtles Research
    Kelly J. McKay, Director, BioEco Research and Monitoring Center
    The methodology and results from the frog and toad breeding chorus survey, as well as the turtle mortality study, done at Big Sand Mound Nature Preserve will be shared. Frog and toad species will be identified and examples of their different calls will be given. Also, the possible causes of turtle mortality and the additional need for research will be discussed.

  2. Cultivating Plants & Growing North America’s First City - Cahokia
    Dr. Michael Wiant, Interim Director, Illinois State Museum
    See description above in Session 2, Workshop C.

  3. Getting the Most From Your Vegetable Garden
    Dr. Denny Schrock, Master Gardener Coordinator and Lecturer, Iowa State Department of Horticulture
    Learn techniques to improve the quality and amount of production you can expect from your vegetable garden. We’ll discuss general topics as well as crop-specific tips for ensuring a bountiful harvest. Whether it’s you’re a first-time gardener or a seasoned grower, pick up some tips to get more for your efforts.

Lunch (12:30 - 1:10 p.m.)

Session 4 (1:15 - 2:10 p.m.)

  1. Showcase Your Houseplants
    Deb Monroe, Clinton County Master Gardeners, and Margo Hansen, Director of Programs, Bickelhaupt Arboretum
    Don’t just stack your houseplants in the window; display those beautiful plants and soften your living space! Houseplant care, propagation and summer care will also be covered. Bring your houseplant questions and leaves for identification. Try and stump the experts - if Margo doesn’t know, Deb will!

  2. Iowa Furbearers
    Mark Roberts, Conservation Education Coordinator, Clinton County Conservation

    Learn about our wide variety of winter mammals here in Clinton County. This will be an informative program where you’ll learn about the various mammals, tracks and other signs. Our collection of tanned furs and some skulls will be shown and shared.

  3. New Vegetable Variety Review n
    Dr. Denny Schrock, Master Gardener Coordinator and Lecturer, Iowa State Department of Horticulture
    Every year plant breeders come up with a host of new varieties that are “new and improved.” It’s difficult to know what’s hype and what’s real. This presentation will cover All-America Selections that have been thoroughly tested and proven their worth, as well as new introductions that look promising or interesting.

Closing Remarks and Door Prizes (2:15 p.m.)

For more information, call 563-242-4771.